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#51642 - 10/31/18 07:23 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
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Aussie Bush Rat
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Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6352
Loc: NSW
Were lucky to have ADI here as powders are always readily available.
They supply Hodgdon and many of the other powder companies as well. Most goes to the armed forces.
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#51659 - 11/06/18 01:13 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1177
Loc: SW Idaho USA
It was very difficult to get powder here a few years ago. Most everything is pretty readily available now, thankfully. I shoot a lot of H4350 and it was very scarce for awhile.

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#51685 - 11/13/18 03:03 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
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Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6352
Loc: NSW
An old picture from 2006. A pig from the mountains where we used to get our bush rock.



So many mornings we'd arrive to start loading and would find twenty to thirty pigs feeding there, from young ones up to the occasional large boar.
The rifle, not one of mine, I think is a BSA Monarch. .243
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#51705 - 11/22/18 11:56 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1177
Loc: SW Idaho USA
I've got a lot of respect for a good .243. I've used one extensively out here for deer, bear, coyote, you name it. They perform well with quality bullets, and we even take a few elk now that we're loading the solid copper Barnes bullets. Not necessarily my elk rifle of choice, but if you put it through the boiler room, it's just as dead as with a big gun ha.

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#51712 - 11/24/18 02:08 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
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Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6352
Loc: NSW
Originally Posted By: Hard Knocks
I've got a lot of respect for a good .243. I've used one extensively out here for deer, bear, coyote, you name it. They perform well with quality bullets, and we even take a few elk now that we're loading the solid copper Barnes bullets. Not necessarily my elk rifle of choice, but if you put it through the boiler room, it's just as dead as with a big gun ha.


They are very popular here as a general hunting rifle, I did own one for a while as well, but could never warm to it for some reason, my mate used to complain about the noise from it, when out spotlighting Roos. He reckoned the .30 cal had a deeper boom and didn't hurt his ears. grin

Among pro shooting fraternity here, "Roo shooters" the .223 is the holy grail of calibers, as it took over from the old .222.
I often see deals from the larger gun shops where 1000 round buys are common, they would be aimed at the pro's

Gun writers often rave over the 25-06 as the caliber for Australian conditions. I reckon it all depends on where you are based. On cattle stations in the gulf,l anything under .30 cal is under gunned and in my opinion, anything over 30-06 is an overkill.

I worked for a company called "Australasian Grazing", they had 24 cattle stations in the Queensland gulf, all around 1000 square miles in size, some a little smaller or larger.
They were happy to supply all the ammunition you were ever wanted, providing it was military surplus. grin
I used to grind the points down on mine flat until you could see lead, it didn't seem to affect accuracy, but did give better stopping ability, unless it was on Buffalo.
A lot of the shooting was on cattle, pigs and the odd Roo if I wanted to give the dog a change from beef. laugh
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#51739 - 12/05/18 12:10 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1177
Loc: SW Idaho USA
It's pretty hard to argue against a 30 cal. for a lot of work, and I'm not surprised those pro shooters favor the .223 as it's a very pleasant caliber if you don't need the extra. The .243 does have a bit of a crack ha! I find it pleasant to shoot though.

Seems like I read somewhere or saw a video about there always being a shortage of roo shooters in Australia.

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#51755 - 12/10/18 02:09 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
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Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6352
Loc: NSW
Originally Posted By: Hard Knocks

Seems like I read somewhere or saw a video about there always being a shortage of Roo shooters in Australia.


It gets to be hard work very quick. I worked at in the early sixties, then again for a while in the mid seventies.

These days, you need to have a licence, shooting areas are controlled by the Pastures Protection Board, property owners are given an order after inspection, by the PPB if its a feral animal ie Rabbits, Pigs etc.
Kangaroos Wallaby's come under the National parks and Fauna. Least that's how it used to be. grin

Back in the early sixties, it was every man and his dog that had a rifle and was after a quid without working for someone else to get it. The prized shooting vehicle was an early Holden car with the back seat removed as well as the boot lid. (trunk)

If you were working for the works it was gutting, butting, (tail off about 5 inches from the butt) Off with the hoppers at the hocks and with the head.

Tools of the trade were a rifle, anywhere up from a .22 to a .303, a Green River Skinning knife and an axe. grin

Far more sophisticated gear today. smile

Usually a .223 rifle, a modern butchers skinning knife and an axe
The vehicle usually a Toyota Landcruiser tray top, with mounted roo racks.

Here's a girl Roo Shooter. grin

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-09/woman-roo-shooter-encourages-others-to-take-it-up/9529660



It appears to be tails on these fellas?






The ideal setup.



An older version.





Back in the sixties, my mate and myself came up with a better plan, we cut the middle man out. grin
We had an old WW2 surplus American Jeep that we used to leave in the paddocks and an 1955 Holden Ute that was used for transportation, we boned the meat out on site and transported it back to the city in a large ice box that fitted on the ute and kept it cold with dry ice.
We had a deal with a large pet shop where he weighted it in front of us and bought it by the pound. Actually One and sixpence a pound. That worked out to be very good money in those days, illegal, but payed very well. grin
We transported the boned meat back to the city every week.

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