Snakes

Posted by: Drumrboy

Snakes - 07/22/12 10:11 PM

Since this is the survival forum, I guess this fits here.

How do you deal with snakes when you are out camping, hiking, or find them in your back yard? There have been plenty of times I was out in the woods and walked right up on one. Or in one case actually stepped on one.

Do you let them be, or do you send them off to a better place? Personally, I don't care much for them. There tends to be a lot of headless snakes around when I'm out and about.

Ian, I know you have some nasty ones down your way.

What do you do?
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/22/12 10:13 PM

Ian bites them and they die or leave.:)
-carl
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/22/12 10:46 PM

That's an Aussie for you!
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/22/12 10:57 PM

That is what I figure. I've been bitten in the boot by a (now dead) rattler. Guess it was a dry bite as they sometimes do. Never had any symptoms and it was a good thing ...no help anywhere. That year I got 9 rattlers over 48" long absent their heads. Lately, I just re-locate them. My daughters influence, I guess.
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/23/12 12:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;7202


Ian, I know you have some nasty ones down your way.

What do you do?


I often see them down in the bottom paddock, particularly around the creek. If it is a Red Belly Black I leave it alone as they eat baby Browns. So does the Kookaburras and I have about eight that live here full time.

The Eastern Brown get's the Merkel treatment. #9 shot from the left barrel no matter where I see them. laugh

We do get Red Belly's up around the house, they are Merkel'd immediately. The wife's cats do tend to keep them away from the house, my dog just steers clear of them.

I've lived in country that is host to some of the really bad ones. browns, tigers, Death Adders and last but not least 6the Taipan.

I found this on the internet, it clearly show that we have our fair share of the bad buggers. laugh

This list suposed to be the top 25 most dangerous in the world.

Facts and Figures: World's Most Venomous Snakes
in categories: facts, figures, most venomous snakes.
Which snake species is the most venomous depends on the measure used. The average or the maximum venom yield from milking could be suggested, but these measures can be criticized as not reflecting the impact of a real bite. The measure generally acknowledged as best reflecting how dangerous a snake's venom is is that of LD50. The lower this number, the less venom is required to cause death. By that measure, the most venomous snake in the world is Australia's inland Taipan (Oxyuranus microlepidotus). The table below gives the top 25 species in order, their LD50, and their distribution.


Snake Species LD50* Distribution

1. Inland taipan 0.025 Australia
2. Eastern brown snake 0.053 Australia
3. Coastal taipan 0.099 Australia
4. Tiger snake 0.118 Australia
5. Black tiger snake 0.131 Australia
6. Beaked sea snake 0.164 Australia
7. Black tiger snake (Chappell Island ssp.) 0.194 - 0.338 Australia
8. Death adder 0.400 Australia
9. Gwardar 0.473 Australia
10. Spotted brown snake 0.360 (in bovine serum albumin) Australia
11. Australian copperhead 0.560 Australia
12. Cobra 0.565 Asia
13. Dugite 0.660 Australia
14. Papuan black snake 1.09 New Guinea
15. Stephens' banded snake 1.36 Australia
16. Rough scaled snake 1.36 Australia
17. King cobra 1.80 Asia
18. Blue-bellied black snake 2.13 Australia
19. Collett's snake 2.38 Australia
20. Mulga snake 2.38 Australia
21. Red-bellied black snake 2.52 Australia
22. Small eyed snake 2.67 Australia
23. Eastern diamond-backed rattlesnake 11.4 North America
24. Black whipsnake >14.2 Australia
25. Fer-de-lance >27.8 South America
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/23/12 03:08 AM

Well, that makes me a four flush newbie. Recon I'll hang around here.....;)
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/23/12 03:56 AM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;7229
Well, that makes me a four flush newbie. Recon I'll hang around here.....;)
-carl


LOL.:D
I don't care what handle they go by, I'd rather not have one latch onto me.

Here's one that really frightens me. Handled by my old mate Vic Hayden. (Deceased)
The inland Taipan.

Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/23/12 07:48 AM

Growing up we lived around copperheads, timber rattlers, water moccasins, and the occasionally mis-placed coral snake. Plenty of non venomous ones as well, but there were enough of the nasty ones around to make me steer clear of them.

My grand pa had an unofficial pet of a 6' black snake. It would show up every afternoon and sun it's self on his porch. He'd go out and pet it occasionally, but not me.

What really did it for me is for several years we had a copperhead nest at the edge of the yard. Right as you hit the tree line. Well, once or twice a year there would be dozens of baby copperheads crawling all over the place. Copperheads have a bit of a mean streak in them. There was one that I cut the head off with a shovel, gave it a nudge and the head flipped around and started biting the shovel. That did it for me. After that I dispatched as many as I could. We had that nest for 5 or 6 years and I finally got sick of them being all over the place, so I burned it out. They moved on and didn't come back after that.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/23/12 03:30 PM

Funny thing about snakes:
I've been running round the country for 60 years, most of it off trails and roads of any kind. I rarely see any snakes and most I do see are non-venomous. But once in a while we have a bad year for them. Then most I see are ON roads and/trails. Go fugure.......
-carl
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/23/12 04:15 PM

Have you ever run into a water moccasin (aka cotton mouth)? They are just mean. I'm talking chase you down mean. I was out fishing one day, and there were several jumping out of trees into the water. They would come up and bite the fish you had on the line. Just cut the line and let it go. The snake would grab it and swim off. Another time I saw one swim up, grab a turtle in its mouth and try to swallow the turtle! Those two fought for a good 20 min before the turtle gave up. The snake wound up swimming off with the turtle in it's mouth. Not sure how well that worked out for the snake. I don't think turtle shell digests very well. Even had one swim over and start running into the boat. I hate those things.

We had a lot of water around us, so between them and the copperheads, you had to watch out where you were going.
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/23/12 04:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;7246
They are just mean. I'm talking chase you down mean.


Most of our snakes will try to avoid you, there are a couple of exceptions, the Tiger snake can become aggressive, also the Western Brown (Gwardar) doesn't seem to try and get out of your way either. The death Adder also seems sluggish and will lay around instead of moving off.

I've lost horses, cattle and dogs to snakes over the years, the dogs being the aggressor get bit usually trying to kill the snake, though most of my working dogs tend to steer clear of them.
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/23/12 05:01 PM

I've never lost an animal to one. My sister always had cats, and I can't even tell you how many times they would bring us a good sized snake to show off. Usually minus the head. They brought all sorts, but mainly blacks and copperheads though. They were good woods cats and weren't afraid of much. Certainly not a 4' copperhead! When we had the copperhead nest, and there were a mess of babies, we would find at least 10 a day on the porch. I'm generally more of a dog person, but I've got no problems with a cat doing snake duty!
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/23/12 06:55 PM

Drumrboy-
Well, I think I might have this figured out.
When I am out and about, I am usually hungry, looking for something to eat. I've eaten more than a few snakes, so they see me as someone to avoid.

You were in their habitat taking their food and saw you as someone to attack or drive off. (I am aassuming you to be a good fisherman. When I fish they just laugh). So quit fishing and the snakes will go away.
-carl
Posted by: Andy the Aussie

- 07/23/12 07:31 PM

If I am out in the bush soemwhere I just leave them be, if they are around camp/home etc then they have to go as the risks are just not worth it. This was a really bad year for Eastern/Common Brown Snakes around where I hunt. Nothing puts a spring in your step like one making good time down a track TOWARDS you (just drove to a gate and was out opening it, my guess is he/she was sunning on the side of the rack and the Landcruiser put the fear into him/her).
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/23/12 08:04 PM

Originally Posted By: Andy the Aussie;7255
This was a really bad year for Eastern/Common Brown Snakes around where I hunt.


I never seen a brown around home this year.
Though, the electricity guy that came to rid our booster box of a fried Possum recently was telling me he seen a monster Brown near the pole, he said it hi-tailed into the bush and was heading down towards our house. I kept a pretty good watch out for him, but still haven't seen him. He'll be around though. laugh
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/23/12 08:12 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;7251


You were in their habitat taking their food and saw you as someone to attack or drive off. (I am aassuming you to be a good fisherman. When I fish they just laugh). So quit fishing and the snakes will go away.
-carl


I've been know to throw out a mean fly from time to time. I had a nice bass (yes, fly fishing for bass) that I lost to a moccasin. I wasn't too happy about that one. But I wasn't about to fight him for it!
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 07/23/12 09:24 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;7264
I've been know to throw out a mean fly from time to time. I had a nice bass (yes, fly fishing for bass) that I lost to a moccasin. I wasn't too happy about that one. But I wasn't about to fight him for it!


Well, I am such a bad fisherman I would have tried. I catch a fish and she's mine.mad
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/24/12 10:23 PM

I once lost a lovely big Suffolk Punch mare to a Western Brown, I managed to find her laying in a bore drain with the typical bite makes to the lips that had turned blue.
Cattle are an easy find as they get it on the tongue, they curl their tongue around their feed and tear it away, where as the horse being a selective feeder sort through the green pick with their lips.

I also lost another horse on that same property, one of the station stock horses, luckily I didn't loose one of my own.

Same place, I returned after mustering and was just making a cup of tea in the kitchen when all of the dogs started barking out the back. I had just stepped out of the fly screen door and witnessed a big western brown strike at and hit one of my dogs on the side of the neck. I kept a .410 shotgun loaded under the settee on the verandah, so I grabbed that and took a shot at him as he was sliding under a concrete slab in the tractor shed. I recon I hit him in the tail section.
I went back to the dog and he was lying on his side quivering, in what seemed about thirty seconds, he was still and dead. I spoke to a vet later down the track about it and he reckoned that the bite probably hit an artery. hence his quick death.

I could go on about snake bite and animals. I lost a stock horse to a Copper Head. (Different to the American Copper Head) I also had a dog survive a bite from, a Blue Belly Black, she was lucky, must have been a poor bite, but she was laid up for more than a week.

Plus I've been bitten on the web between the fingers by a Red Belly Black. (my fault) I must say it was the most excruciating pain that night that I've felt).
Posted by: MonkeyBomb

- 07/26/12 09:11 PM

On the farm. I always had a flat bladed shovel handy. Too many poisonous snakes. Makes it easy to take a snakes head right off. I left most non poisonous snakes alone. The keep rodents down. Unless they got into the chicken coop they were safe. Of course the SOB's would eat eggs and try to leave through a knothole etc. A few wooden eggs catchs them pretty quick. I absolutely hated reaching under a hen to check for an egg and finding a snake.
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/27/12 02:45 AM

Originally Posted By: MonkeyBomb;7456
On the farm. I always had a flat bladed shovel handy. Too many poisonous snakes. Makes it easy to take a snakes head right off.


They're fairly harmless once the head is missing. laugh

A lot of farmers her keep a doubled over piece of eight gauge wire handy near the back door, they break their backs with it. They are still dangerous with broken backs though.
Posted by: MonkeyBomb

- 07/27/12 03:52 AM

I used to keep a shovel in my hand when I picked up anything big enough to hide a snake. You never knew where a copperhead was hiding. Nasty ill tempered things.
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/31/12 10:23 PM

Originally Posted By: MonkeyBomb;7469
I used to keep a shovel in my hand when I picked up anything big enough to hide a snake. You never knew where a copperhead was hiding. Nasty ill tempered things.


I'm always careful when picking up rubbish or old iron sheeting, they get under places like that for cover.

Like Carl mentioned earlier, when picking up rocks, never roll the rock away from you, it's a sure way to put yourself in close striking range of them.
I loaded bushrock for a living for many years and have seen it all as far as what critters live under them. laugh

I do however remember a small brown snake latching onto my glove when rolling a rock over, I must have pinched him with the rock, he was well and truly pi$$ed off.

Here's another pic of my old mate Vic, free handling a ticked off Black Tiger.

Posted by: Drumrboy

- 07/31/12 11:06 PM

That's a brave man there!
Posted by: Trumby

- 07/31/12 11:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;7685
That's a brave man there!


Here's a scared one here. laugh
A young yours truly handling a harmless python.

Posted by: Joshua R.

- 08/01/12 09:14 AM

Is that snake coiling up for a strike. I think so. LOL
Posted by: PatrickKnight

- 08/01/12 01:09 PM

Where I grew up in the hill country of Texas we had rattlers around often. I didnt mind having them around cause I would very quickly remove there head from there body and let me tell ya thats a good snake to eat. Then I moved to Dallas and only saw small garden snakes now in southwest Ohio again only small garden snakes and in the river we have cottonmouths (which I stay far away from these guys because they will come after you.)
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 08/01/12 02:24 PM

Cottonmouths are one mean snake. I don't like them one bit.
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 08/01/12 05:37 PM

I have had to fend more than a few Cottonmouths off with my fishing pole. Good thing my pole is 7 feet long and acts like one heck of a whip.
Posted by: Trumby

- 08/01/12 06:04 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.;7709
Is that snake coiling up for a strike. I think so. LOL


I thought so at the time. laugh I was fairly crapping myself there. It might not have poison, but it looked to have sharp teeth. laugh
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 08/01/12 07:52 PM

Even snakes like that I'm not fond of Ian. If it slithers, it better be slithering away from me!
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 08/01/12 07:53 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.;7717
I have had to fend more than a few Cottonmouths off with my fishing pole. Good thing my pole is 7 feet long and acts like one heck of a whip.


Ever had one jump out of a tree by you? That will make you move the boat in one big hurry! It doesnt matter how good the fishing is. When it's raining cotton mouths, I'm outta there.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 08/01/12 11:51 PM

It seems we need a new blade, about 7 feet long, for cotton mouth training. I envision a rapier-like rod with a cat-o nine tails tip- all steel.
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 08/02/12 03:48 AM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;7744
It seems we need a new blade, about 7 feet long, for cotton mouth training. I envision a rapier-like rod with a cat-o nine tails tip- all steel.
-carl


Or #9 shot at ten feet. laugh

How would you like to meet this evil bugger in camp at night. The Inland Taipan or Fierce Snake.

Posted by: Drumrboy

- 08/02/12 07:29 AM

That's not anything I want to see in my camp. It would be unloaded on with no mercy!
Posted by: Trumby

- 08/02/12 03:03 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;7758
That's not anything I want to see in my camp. It would be unloaded on with no mercy!


Me too. laugh

I've never seen one around a camp, mostly I've seen them crossing a track when driving around the bores on a station. I've heard that they strike as fast as Lightning and will bite as many as seven or eight times in a strike.
I never want to find out first hand anyways. laugh
Posted by: Andy the Aussie

- 08/02/12 05:31 PM

Nasty bit of work... saw one of these little darlings while we were walking around Ayers Rock...


Posted by: Carl Theile

- 08/02/12 08:32 PM

ANY snake with an ugly disposition and venom could be hazardous to my health ...unless I see him first- and that is my plan.:D
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 08/04/12 04:43 AM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;7799
ANY snake with an ugly disposition and venom could be hazardous to my health ...unless I see him first- and that is my plan.:D
-carl


Mine too. laugh

Though I was knocking the bark off some strainer posts one time in the bush, then sat under an Iron Bark to have a drink out of my water bottle. I reached over and laying beside it was a fair sized Death Adder. I had that cold feeling go over me (the fear of death :D)

I slowly stood back up and moved away hoping he wasn't going to strike. He didn't, but I did, I had an old single barrel 12 gauge shot gun behind the seat of the Landcruiser that removed any chance of him ever scaring me again. laugh
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 08/04/12 09:07 PM

Ya made a good snake out of a bad snake. laugh
-carl
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 09/11/12 10:49 PM

You know, I've lived in my place for about 8 years now. Never seen a snake around the place. I'm out in the yard the other day and see 2 in 5 minutes! First one took off like a bat out of hell! I think I scared him more than anything. Couple minutes later, I'm in the same part of the yard and see another one take off towards the house. I couldn't find that one. I just hope it doesn't find it's way in the house somehow. It's starting to get a bit of a chill at night, so a nice warm house would be pretty inviting to him.
I wasn't going to mention it to my wife, but one of them headed right into her flower bed. Figured I'd save her from coming face to face with it while pilling weeds. That would not go so well.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 09/11/12 11:13 PM

Well the job of a man, I am told, is to protect his wife from harm Etc.... Where that job becomes most perilous is when he tries to convince her to come out and observe a snake so closely (but safely) that she can identify it at a glance and take evasive maneuvers or kill it as the situation demands.

................................my wife hears there is a snake nearby (to her that means within a mile or so) and she decides to remain indoors till I go out and find it and kill it if required- and no, she is not interested in viewing a dead snake.............................

so, what is a man to do?:rolleyes:

-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 09/11/12 11:16 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;9672
I wasn't going to mention it to my wife, but one of them headed right into her flower bed. Figured I'd save her from coming face to face with it while pilling weeds. That would not go so well.


My wife sees most of them here. I remember about fifteen years ago, hearing her hollow out from her strawberry patch, she was wearing a pair of low sided sheep skin boots and a Red Belly Black flashed back and bit her on the side of the boot. A coule of inches higher and it would have been her leg.
She swears that she didn't step on it, but I still don't believe that. A Red belly will usually try to get away before biting.
The snake you have seen will probably be long gone now, but it does pay to let her know.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 09/11/12 11:24 PM

Ian-
See post #41.
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 09/12/12 12:21 AM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;9675
Well the job of a man, I am told, is to protect his wife from harm Etc.... Where that job becomes most perilous is when he tries to convince her to come out and observe a snake so closely (but safely) that she can identify it at a glance and take evasive maneuvers or kill it as the situation demands.

................................my wife hears there is a snake nearby (to her that means within a mile or so) and she decides to remain indoors till I go out and find it and kill it if required- and no, she is not interested in viewing a dead snake.............................

so, what is a man to do?:rolleyes:

-carl


LOL. laugh

I believe you can only do the honorable thing here. You wander off out of sight, sit under a tree and have a smoke, then go back and say, it took some doing, but I fixed that bugger up. He’ll never bother you again. laugh
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 09/12/12 07:56 AM

I like that answer Ian.

The reaction I got when I told her was she instantly turned pale and said " I'm never going in the yard again!". Needless to say, she falls in the category of someone who would not care to see said dead snake afterwards.

Now if I could just get one of the cats around here to start hunting, they could earn their keep!
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 09/12/12 08:51 AM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;9688
Now if I could just get one of the cats around here to start hunting, they could earn their keep!


If they are like the cats around my house, you will have better luck buying a large predatory bird and letting it perch in the back yard. It will most likely take care of the cat problem too. wink
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 09/12/12 02:56 PM

Well, the cats are belong to my wife. They are her territory. We did have one that used to hunt on a regular basis and leave us all sorts of presents on the front porch. But she is a bit old now and has slowed down quite a bit on her killing. I liked it better when she at least killed something every now and then!
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 09/12/12 03:34 PM

I had a Barn cat like that. Key word is HAD. She liked to torment my lab. One day I came home to find my dog very excited. She decided to show me her latest trick. Turns out she learned how to throw a cat up in the air and catch it. I love when animals learn to play by themselves. wink
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 09/12/12 11:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.;9696
I had a Barn cat like that. Key word is HAD. She liked to torment my lab. One day I came home to find my dog very excited. She decided to show me her latest trick. Turns out she learned how to throw a cat up in the air and catch it. I love when animals learn to play by themselves. wink


That lab should hold council with snakes- teach them to play by themselves.
-carl
Posted by: PatrickKnight

- 09/13/12 12:32 PM

My cats hunt like a pack of lions. The fat calico hangs out while the others corner the rat or whatever else they may be chasing then fatty comes in like a male lion would to deliver the death blow. Its acutally funny to watch them chase and hunt something cause they have no idea how to work together and will often run straight in to one another.
Posted by: Andy the Aussie

- 10/08/12 06:35 AM

Trumby......did you see the news about the kid bitten by an Inland Taipan at Kurri Kurri...???? Lucky they IDed the snake fast (helps when it is brought in with him).

Andy
Posted by: Trumby

- 10/09/12 05:21 AM

Originally Posted By: Andy the Aussie;11030
Trumby......did you see the news about the kid bitten by an Inland Taipan at Kurri Kurri...???? Lucky they IDed the snake fast (helps when it is brought in with him).

Andy


Yes, I did see that, he's one very lucky young fellow.
Posted by: Thesnakeman

- 04/01/13 03:22 PM

when i go kayaking in Francis Marion national forest (Note: i love snakes, all of them) and when i ether find land or sleep in my hammock in between some trees i have had a few snakes try to get in the hammock with me put i just calmly picked them up and let them swim away. anther thing is that if you are hungry as someone above mentioned that snakes can be excellent survival food because they are high in protein and are super easy to clean and kill
that just my .02 worth
Thomas
Posted by: Dogtired

- 04/03/13 01:19 AM

We've got copperheads and timber rattlers here, but as a general rule, I let 'em all be. Most snakes are good. They keep the vermin down. I like rodents less than snakes. If it's something resembling a copperhead it doesn't survive too long.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 04/03/13 09:56 PM

Snakes have never been a problem for me stateside, and I spend a fair bit of time in their turf.
-carl
Posted by: Dogtired

- 04/04/13 10:14 PM

I was working in the yard once carrying lumber from one side to the other. I was carrying a heavy load and stepped over a piece of black plastic yard waste. Deposited the lumber and was stepping back over the yard waste when I realized it was writhing. Mid step I jumped at least 6 feet in the air as I realized it was an eight foot black snake making its way under my shed. Harmless constrictor, but dang that gave me a start!
Posted by: Fuer Grissa Ost Draika

- 04/06/13 10:05 PM

Great thread. I love snakes and have a certain appreciation for Australian hots. As an interesting aside, I have beheaded, skinned and gutted numerous rattlers for the pot over the years (I live in NorCal) and almost every one of them has struck at me AFTER being beheaded, skinned and gutted. It still amazes me every time.
Posted by: Dogtired

- 04/07/13 12:52 AM

Zombie snakes! NOW we're screwed!
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 04/07/13 01:21 AM

I don't care for snakes, and zombie snakes are even worse!

I've beheaded my fair share of copperheads and it amazes how they will keep bitting after their heads are cut off.
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/07/13 06:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;19791

I've beheaded my fair share of copperheads and it amazes how they will keep bitting after their heads are cut off.


Even after they've stopped biting they are still dangerous, there's been more than a few here that have accidently stuck themselves on the finger from a dead snake. laugh
Posted by: Dogtired

- 04/07/13 10:04 PM

Well, if you're daft enough to stick your finger in the mouth of a beheaded snake, you win the Darwin Award laugh
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 04/07/13 10:27 PM

I never did that, but I remember the first time, as a kid, that I cut off a coperhead's head and poked it with a stick and it started biting the stick. That scared the crap out of me. But, lesson learned.
Posted by: Fuer Grissa Ost Draika

- 04/07/13 11:10 PM

While I didn't say "bite", I said "struck" and there is a distinctive difference, I have seen many 'bite" after having their head removed from the body. It is one of the reasons snakes are so fast, they don't need a signal from the brain to do so, the entire muscle system is programed for it. In some cases the bodies were still striking 20 minute after having been beheaded, skinned and gutted.
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/07/13 11:39 PM

Here's a picture of my long time mate, (now deceased) kissing a Tiger Snake up in the top five of the worlds most toxic snakes. the write up is slightly incorrect, he was in hospital for five months after the bite.
I rushed him to hospital and it was a fair drive, flat out. I had a mate holding him in the passengers seat and at least 3 or 4 times we thought he had died on the way in.

He had so many snake bites over the years that it was believed he had built up an imunity to some degree.

It was a hot day and he was giving them a swim to cool off. I was managing a tourist park at the time and we were expecting 1700 school children in that day. While I had someone run down to get my vehicle I shot, I think was eleven venenous snakes as there was no way I was going to try and catch them and put them back into the bags. laugh

Posted by: elof_alv

- 04/12/13 02:41 AM

A 13 foot 20 pounds long python was found in a house in a town in Queensland today smile
Posted by: Private Klink

- 04/12/13 06:40 PM

That's a LOT of snake!..eek
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/16/13 12:08 AM

One sick puppy. laugh





These pics were taken from a book that was given to after the death of my mate Vic Hayden.
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 04/16/13 08:10 AM

I like snakes when they are slightly under cooked. That is the only way they are acceptable. laugh
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 04/16/13 08:41 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.;20164
I like snakes when they are slightly under cooked. That is the only way they are acceptable. laugh


Well, I'm sorta with you there, though I don't kill them anymore for any other reason. They really are useful. Helps keep tourists in check.
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/16/13 09:42 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;20206
Well, I'm sorta with you there, though I don't kill them anymore for any other reason. They really are useful. Helps keep tourists in check.
-carl


Me too. laugh
I only kill them when they are up around the house, I often come across them in the bush or down around the creek. Eastern Browns are a different story, I shoot them in the paddocks if I see them around. They are evil buggers. laugh
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 04/16/13 10:34 PM

Originally Posted By: Trumby;20225
Me too. laugh
I only kill them when they are up around the house, I often come across them in the bush or down around the creek. Eastern Browns are a different story, I shoot them in the paddocks if I see them around. They are evil buggers. laugh


I hear you there. Bye the way, how are your spots? Fading I hope.
-carl
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/17/13 12:17 AM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;20232
I hear you there. Bye the way, how are your spots? Fading I hope.
-carl


The spots aren't going so I think it might be another trip to the Doc's for more pills. How's the hand coming along?
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 04/17/13 11:14 AM

Of course, now that I'm out of town again, my wife finds another snake in the back yard. Actually, one of the dogs found it. I'm just glad he didn't think it was a chew toy and try to bring it in the house. I would have heard her screaming from here....
Posted by: Trumby

- 04/17/13 06:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;20257
Of course, now that I'm out of town again, my wife finds another snake in the back yard. Actually, one of the dogs found it. I'm just glad he didn't think it was a chew toy and try to bring it in the house. I would have heard her screaming from here....


Hi mate,
Do you own a .410 shotgun? We used to get Death Adders coming up around the paths at the house at one of the cattle stations I managed. My wife would hear the dogs barking at them, come out and blast them from the verandah. laugh She became pretty good at it eventually, apart from the chips out of the concrete path everywhere, there wasn't a Death Adder safe in the whole area. laugh
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 04/17/13 10:09 PM

Originally Posted By: Trumby;20240
The spots aren't going so I think it might be another trip to the Doc's for more pills. How's the hand coming along?


Well, the hand / wrist / forearm is in a cast. Aside from discovering that one arm is shorter than the other (by having to wipe with the wrong hand- never practiced that mad) I am fine. :rolleyes:....

Hey, ask the doc if he can't get the spots to go away, could he get them to merge in camo colors? :p
-carl
Posted by: Dogtired

- 04/17/13 11:56 PM

I step away for a bit and everyone falls apart. What gives? Ian, Carl, what's wrong?
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 04/18/13 01:46 AM

The Swamp is full of slightly worse for the wear people these days DT. We are a rough bunch on ourselves!
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 04/18/13 01:48 AM

Originally Posted By: Trumby;20325
Hi mate,
Do you own a .410 shotgun? We used to get Death Adders coming up around the paths at the house at one of the cattle stations I managed. My wife would hear the dogs barking at them, come out and blast them from the verandah. laugh She became pretty good at it eventually, apart from the chips out of the concrete path everywhere, there wasn't a Death Adder safe in the whole area. laugh


My luck, she would grab the 12 ga. by mistake and blow the hell out of everything around her!

She did try to kill it, but couldn't bring herself to do it. She is a softy like that. (She has to be a softy to put up with me)