OT: Looking for some new books .

Posted by: Joshua R.

OT: Looking for some new books . - 01/16/13 12:26 PM

I am a huge fan of reading and am always looking for a new book. I love anything that is based on real life and especially military topics. I am also a huge fan of biographies about influential people of the past. Looking for a few suggestions from my friends here. What are you guys reading?

Thanks
Joshua
Posted by: Lora

- 01/16/13 01:00 PM

Feel free to include any and all fictitious books as well. I'm always looking for a good read and I like many different types; fiction, non-fiction, bio, I like them all. smile

Josh, I really like the Frankenstein series by Dean Koontz, as well as The Great Gastpy by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren.
Posted by: bonesmalones

- 01/16/13 03:45 PM

Meat Eater: Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter by Steven Rinella. Fun to read. I love his TV show too.
Posted by: Need2Know

- 01/16/13 04:33 PM

I love me some Dr. Seuss.

I kid.

It is however refreshing to occasionnally read/ re-read early documents that shape our Nation. There is more to the Constitution than just the preamble and the amendments.
Posted by: Trumby

- 01/16/13 06:48 PM

I love western books. But my all time favorites are Hell West and Crooked by Tom Cole and A Fortunate Life by A.B. Facey, both Australian books.
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 01/17/13 09:10 AM

Ian, I just got done reading a book by an Aussie. Culture of Complaint the author (can't remember his name) had me rolling on the ground with his outsider look on the USA. Sadly it was all true.
Posted by: elof_alv

- 01/17/13 09:31 AM

Josh, if you ever change your tastes in book type I'd say going after a massive series is good, for example Star Wars or Warhammer/Warhammer 40K. There are already hundreds of books for both, and new ones are being written all the time.
Posted by: Lora

- 01/17/13 04:13 PM

Josh recommended Culture of Complaint: The Fraying of America to me. The author is Robert Hughes. I might have to borrow it once I'm done with Gone Girl by Jillian Flynn
Posted by: Trumby

- 01/17/13 04:21 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.;14757
I love anything that is based on real life and especially military topics.
Thanks
Joshua


Josh, I have a new one to read that was given to me for xmas. Soldier Dogs written by Maria Goodavage. I'm waiting for a good oportunity to get stuck into it.
I too like reading military books. My most recent was SAS by Ian McPhedran. About the Aussie elite special forces.
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 01/17/13 05:12 PM

Oliver North writes some pretty interesting fictional books. He has a series, so make sure you start with the first one. It really ties in to what he was doing back in the 80's.
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 01/17/13 05:14 PM

I am currently reading "The Disappearing Spoon...And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, And The History Of The World From The Periodic Table Of The Elements". It's a science book, but once upon a time I studied to be a chemist.
Posted by: Tristine

- 02/06/13 11:17 AM

How about "To Kill a Mockingbird" or "Pride and Prejudice";)
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 02/06/13 11:35 AM

To kill a mockingbird was a great book. Pride and prejudice is another good book. I have not finished it yet but so far i like it.
Posted by: PatrickKnight

- 02/06/13 05:30 PM

Robert Jordan Wheel of Time series. I can not recommend these enough they are easily the best series I have ever read.
Posted by: Cut it out

- 02/09/13 08:58 PM

David Morrell's books are good. Rambo was based on his characters. The Protector is the lateset of his I'm reading.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 02/09/13 09:01 PM

I rather like the Velveteen Rabbit. :rolleyes:
-carl
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 02/11/13 05:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile;16170
I rather like the Velveteen Rabbit. :rolleyes:
-carl


Oddly enough, I did read that recently.
Posted by: Trumby

- 02/11/13 06:51 PM

Bryce Courtenay is one of my favorite authors, to name a few of his books that I've read.

The Power Of One
Jessica
The Story Of Danny Dunn
Brother Fish
Smoky Joe's Cafe
Tommo And Hawk
The Potato Factory
Sylvia
The Persimmon Tree
Tandia
Solomon's Song

To name a few, a South African born Aussie and a great story teller.
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 02/11/13 08:27 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;16262
Oddly enough, I did read that recently.


I do find that odd. I intended this as a read unlikely for most folks here. :rolleyes:
That said, it is a good read- especially for teenage girls ...though there is a message there for everyone.
Klink should read it dontcha think?:)
-carl
Posted by: Drumrboy

- 02/11/13 09:20 PM

I would be surprised if that isn't at the top of Klink's list.

Latest thing I read was a manual for a new console. Fun and exciting reading there!
Posted by: Carl Theile

- 02/11/13 11:33 PM

Originally Posted By: Drumrboy;16293
I would be surprised if that isn't at the top of Klink's list.



Well, he is a bit too old to be a teenage girl, methinks.
-carl
Posted by: Joshua R.

- 02/12/13 04:22 PM

Just finished "Shooter" and half way through "The making of DELTA Force". Both very good.
Posted by: Tristine

- 02/13/13 01:30 PM

How about some Shel Silverstein. "Where the Sidewalk Ends";)
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 06/26/14 12:21 AM

Well, I just downloaded a new book onto my Kindle "The Lonesome Dove Chronicles" by Larry McMurry.

Its a whopper as it covers four books.

Dead Mans Walk
Comanche Moon
Lonesome Dove
Streets of Laredo

All bigguns' grin

I'm planin' to get out in the bush somewhere on the pretext of getting firewood, find a good log in the sun and read the bugger.
I've read the first four pages, and this is going to be a beauty.

If anyone wants it, just PM me and I'll send her through in what ever format you want. text, epub or mobi, or whatever turns yopu on. grin
Posted by: Dogtired

Re: - 06/26/14 08:24 PM

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Dreadfully Ever After

Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters

Android Karenina

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter

Alt timeless classics.
Posted by: Dogtired

Re: - 06/26/14 08:32 PM

If that's not your cup of tea:

"Gifted Hands: the Ben Carson Story"

"Liberty and Tyranny" by Mark Levin
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 06/28/14 03:44 PM

I like reading the hillside news.

-carl
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 06/28/14 08:40 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile
I like reading the hillside news.

-carl


Yeah, there's always something new to read there.

I love reading books though, especially westerns, I'm well into the first book of my Lonesome dove chronicles. Dead Man Walking. I also have a few more by the same author after I wade through this mammoth of a book.

Also a couple I have of the American pioneering days on the Oregon trail. One I have read twice.

Another author is an Aussie, Tom Cole, His are really not fiction, but real accounts of his life in the Australian outback, Buffalo and crocodile hunting, also living of a horse and traveling vast distances, droving cattle and station life as it was in the early part of the 1900's.
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 06/28/14 09:38 PM

That last one I would read... Aussie life intrigues me- the old life, not present day stuff smile

-carl
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 06/30/14 06:20 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile
That last one I would read... Aussie life intrigues me- the old life, not present day stuff smile

-carl


My favorite of his is "Hell West and Crooked" I've read it a couple of times. Also I worked with an old fella he mentions in his book. Bill Cousins. He refers to him as a young horseman and Buff shooter of some renown.
He was an old fella and managing a contract cattle camp when I knew him.
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 07/01/14 01:42 PM

Funny how that happens. Folks get old ...and it seems to happen overnight!

-carl
Posted by: worldwood

Re: - 07/01/14 02:23 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.
Just finished "Shooter" and half way through "The making of DELTA Force". Both very good.


Shooter is one of my favorite movies.
Posted by: MonkeyBomb

Re: - 07/05/14 01:15 AM

I read The Martian by Andy Wehr. Pretty darned good book.
Posted by: Lora

Re: - 07/10/14 09:57 PM

Let's get some new suggestions going. I am in dire need of a good read. What recommendations do you guys have?
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 07/13/14 09:02 PM

A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There

Book by Aldo Leopold

You will not regret reading this one.

Quote:
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac


-carl
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 09/17/14 10:46 PM

I'm currently reading a new one.

True Spirit. A book about an Aussie girl who at the age of sixteen, sailed solo around the world, non stop.

I'm a third of the way through and really enjoying it. I remember when she left and returned home. Left in 2009 and returned in 2010.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 09/17/14 10:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile
A Sand County Almanac: And Sketches Here and There

Book by Aldo Leopold

You will not regret reading this one.

Quote:
“There are two spiritual dangers in not owning a farm. One is the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace.”
Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac


-carl


I'll go looking for those, they sound like my kind of reading.
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 09/17/14 10:50 PM

I do remember that. All of Australia should read that book out of pride. I will read it out of envy smile

-carl
Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 09/18/14 09:40 AM

I will also have to check that one out.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 10/01/14 06:45 PM

Reading another adventure book about sailing.

Dove by Robin Lee Graham,, just started it and so far it looks like a good one.

Wikipedia:

Robin Lee Graham (born March 5, 1949) is an American sailor. He set out to sail around the world alone as a teenager in the summer of 1965. National Geographic Magazine ( Oct. '68, April '69, Oct. '70) carried the story, and he co-wrote a book, titled Dove, detailing his journey.

Before beginning his around-the-world journey, Graham had sailed alone from California to Hawaii. However, he declared the official starting point of his around-the-world journey to be Hawaii, where he and his family lived at the time. At the age of sixteen, he started out heading west in his 24-foot sloop. He was originally given two kittens for company, that he named Joliette and Suzette, and through his travels lost and gained several more, ultimately docking with Kili, Pooh, and Piglet. He married along the way and, after almost five years, ended his journey in Los Angeles instead of finishing his around-the-world journey where he started in Hawaii. He and his wife, Patti Ratterree, briefly attended Stanford University, then settled in Montana.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 10/31/14 05:19 PM

Reading a new book about my favorite movie hero.

"John Wayne my Father"

I've met the man, shook his hand, even hired out three horses to him. grin



I've only just started it, but already finding it interesting.
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 11/01/14 09:17 PM

Still reading I suspect. I had (made) a jacket like he is wearing in that photo. Recon I liked the man as well ...or the parts he portrayed, perhaps.

-carl
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 12/20/14 03:18 PM

Into a new cowboy book, "The Texans"

Its a goodun too! grin

Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 12/20/14 08:50 PM

My next one lined up to read. grin

I only watch cricket, rugby league and the news on telly, so that gives more time to read. laugh

Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 12/20/14 10:24 PM

That time will come for me, I suspect, but I watch no TV (except Dude, You're screwed- great stuff). The rain has kept me busy playing with debris huts, and my Jeep has kept me busy with a starter / starter solenoid / battery issue. I think I am on to a solution with that, but I missed out on a trip to Death Valley to meet up with friends out of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Maybe next year.

-carl
Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 01/08/15 11:57 AM

I just started reading "UNBROKEN" it is very good so far.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 01/08/15 05:38 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.
I just started reading "UNBROKEN" it is very good so far.


I'll look out for that one! Is it the book that the movie was made from down here recently, directed by Angelina Jolie?

Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 01/08/15 09:41 PM

I finished "Killing Patton" a few days ago; now I'm reading EXODUS. smile
Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 01/09/15 11:17 AM

Yes Ian that is the book.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 01/09/15 04:32 PM

Originally Posted By: Joshua R.
Yes Ian that is the book.


Thanks, I intended to watch the movie when it came out.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 01/09/15 04:33 PM

Originally Posted By: Private Klink
I finished "Killing Patton" a few days ago; now I'm reading EXODUS. smile


Tom, I have both of those books on my Kindle, but have not read them yet.
Killing Patton is a big book, so I'll need to be in the right frame of mind before I tackle that one, I also have War and Peace, another monster book. grin
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 01/09/15 10:59 PM

"Killing Patton" is actually a pretty fast read. wink
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 01/09/15 11:43 PM

Originally Posted By: Private Klink
"Killing Patton" is actually a pretty fast read. wink


Its actually over 3 meg on my kindle, so there must be a heap of pictures in it.
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 01/10/15 07:23 AM

Not too many pictures, but plenty of maps. wink
Posted by: RPN

Re: - 01/14/15 02:00 PM

I just finished re-reading The Black Banners by Ali Soufan. He was a FBI agent from the mid 90's on and very involved with terrorism investigations and Bin Laden. You get to see some great work and less than great as well.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/09/15 08:46 PM

Anyone read this one?

American Sniper
The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History

I'm thinking of buying it from Amazon.

Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 03/10/15 09:47 AM

It is a great book.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/10/15 03:03 PM

Thanks Josh.

I bought it this morning and will read it next. I'm currently reading a book about a family traveling around Australia in 1956 when a lot of the major roads were still two wheel tracks in the bush.

Towing a van with an 1956 Ford Customline.

A good book where they supplemented their food cost by fishing and shooting Rabbits.
Also gathering fresh mushrooms and fruits along the side of the road when available.
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 03/10/15 09:20 PM

Last week I finished reading "90 Minutes at Entebbe", about the Israeli rescue of hostages in 76'. Those folks REALLY have their act together! wink
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/14/15 07:06 PM

I'm already 60% through American Sniper and enjoying it so much I've bought one he recommends in his book.

Lone Survivor:
The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

Have you read that one as well, Josh.
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 03/16/15 11:02 AM

Seal team 10 has a legacy:

Demonstration of the tenet: The team is greater than the sum of its parts.

Sadly, Few are ever part of such a team.

-carl
Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 03/16/15 01:16 PM

Yes I have read that one. Also a very good read.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 06/17/15 12:14 AM

Reading a new one and its a beauty!

The Revenant: A Novel of Revenge by Michael Punke

Their bringing a movie out on it next year, About a trapper left for dead by his mates, he survived.


Page 1.

THEY WERE ABANDONING HIM. The wounded man knew it when he looked at the boy, who looked down, then away, unwilling to hold his gaze.
For days, the boy had argued with the man in the wolf-skin hat. Has it really been days? The wounded man had battled his fever and pain, never certain whether conversations he heard were real, or merely by-products of the delirious wanderings in his mind.
He looked up at the soaring rock formation above the clearing. A lone, twisted pine had managed somehow to grow from the sheer face of the stone. He had stared at it many times, yet it had never appeared to him as it did at that moment, when its perpendicular lines seemed clearly to form a cross. He accepted for the first time that he would die there in that clearing by the spring.
Posted by: Joshua R.

Re: - 06/17/15 09:24 AM

Sounds like a great book. I will have to check it out.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/30/16 12:33 AM

Weathers cooling and time to get out my battle scared kindle for a new book. grin



Its about one of Americas most prestigious horse trainers, only just got thought the introductions so far.

The Faraway Horses

The Adventures and Wisdom of One of America's Most Renowned Horsemen

By Buck Brannaman, Bill Reynolds (With), William Reynolds

Published In: United States, 01 February 2005
Telling the story of Buck Brannaman's life, this book gives horse owners the keys to understanding their animals. Buck Brannaman is a horse gentler - not a horse "breaker" - who has started more than 10,000 young horses in his clinics. Buck Brannaman's method of training focuses on communicating with horses, reading their body language and making them feel safe so that horse and rider can achieve a true union and in this book, he shares the knowledge he has cultivated over a lifetime. He also provides a behind-the-scenes glimpse of Robert Redford's movie "The Horse Whisperer", for which he was the technical advisor.
About the Author

Buck Brannaman is a horse gentler - not a horse "breaker" - who has started more than 10,000 young horses in his clinics. He lives with his wife Mary and their three daughters in Sheridan, Wyoming. William Reynolds is the associate publisher of Cowboys & Indians magazine and lives with his family in Santa Ynez, California.
Reviews

'Buck Brannaman is part of a lineage of skilled horsemen, and for the horses he works with, it is about trust and understanding, not submission." - Robert Redford "When it comes to horses, Buck Brannaman is part guru, part psychologist, and all cowboy. He's a 19th-century man in a 21st-century world, and his life is at once inspirational and instructive." - Tom Brokaw "I've started horses since I was 12 years old and have been bit, kicked, bucked off and run over. I've tried every physical means to contain my horse in an effort to keep from getting myself killed. I started to realize that things would come much easier for me once I learned why a horse does what he does. This method works well for me because of the kinship that develops between horse and rider. Horses and life, it's all the same to me." - Buck Brannaman
Posted by: Carl Theile

Re: - 03/30/16 11:10 AM

Ian-

These folks are amazing in what they do and how they do it. There is a fella I see regularly working horses near my place. I love watching him work and can spend hours there- it has become, at least partially, my pastime. I envy some of his skills.

I hope you enjoy that book.

-carl
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 03/30/16 06:15 PM

Ian, that story is about real-life Mountain Man Hugh Glass, and the boy who abandoned him was future great Mountain Man Jim Bridger. When Hugh caught up to him, he decided that Bridger was too young to deserve killing and therefore spared him. The other fellow had joined the Army, so Hugh didn't bother with seeking his revenge. But it sure gave him a reason to persevere! wink
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/30/16 07:42 PM

Originally Posted By: Private Klink
Ian, that story is about real-life Mountain Man Hugh Glass, and the boy who abandoned him was future great Mountain Man Jim Bridger. When Hugh caught up to him, he decided that Bridger was too young to deserve killing and therefore spared him. The other fellow had joined the Army, so Hugh didn't bother with seeking his revenge. But it sure gave him a reason to persevere! wink


Tom, that is an awesome book, I enjoyed every bit of it. I'd like to see the movie as well when I get a chance.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 03/30/16 07:47 PM

Originally Posted By: Carl Theile
Ian-

These folks are amazing in what they do and how they do it. There is a fella I see regularly working horses near my place. I love watching him work and can spend hours there- it has become, at least partially, my pastime. I envy some of his skills.

I hope you enjoy that book.

-carl

Carl,
I'm just getting into the book and starting to enjoy it. The two brothers had it tough, their father used to make them stand against a fence and hang onto the rail while he flogged them with a stock whip.

And I used to grumble about my father being tough, he only used a tree branch. grin
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 03/31/16 12:53 AM

Ian, "The Revenant" is basically a re-make of the 70's movie "Man in the Wilderness" starring Richard Harris as the Hugh Glass character..."Zak Bass" in the movie. I hope to see the new one when it's available on DVD. smile
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 04/06/16 05:29 AM

Thanks Tom, I'm pretty sure that I haven't seen the old one as well.
Posted by: ThatGuyCF

Re: - 04/06/16 09:17 AM

Here's just a short mix of both my favorite quick and long reads. The Hatchet series by Gary Paulsen, The Rifle by Gary Paulsen, A Painted House by John Grisham, Great Expectations by Charles Dickens, the Alex Cross series by James Patterson, Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingles Wilder, and any of the Hardy Boys books are a great bet!
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 04/08/16 02:14 AM

Thanks, I'll check them out!
Posted by: Private Klink

Re: - 04/08/16 08:14 PM

I'm presently reading "The Blackout Wars" and "Electric Armageddon"; both dealing with EMP and its effects.
Posted by: RPN

Re: - 04/09/16 10:39 AM

Originally Posted By: Private Klink
I'm presently reading "The Blackout Wars" and "Electric Armageddon"; both dealing with EMP and its effects.


That cannot be good!

I just picked up a book by Isabelle Allende.

Was really hoping to see if there was anything new by Carl Hiaasen- if you guys have never ready his books, grab them! He does these quasi mysteries that are just HILARIOUS!! He is from Florida and just crazy and his books are laugh out loud funny. He has a number of the same characters, so I would suggest starting at his first novel.
Posted by: Trumby

Re: - 06/18/19 07:27 PM

Reading a book that I read many years ago, about a boy that was sent to a cattle station at 8 years old and was mistreated by the owners.
It's a great Australian book set in Western Australia.

A Fortunate Life by A.B. Facey



Albert Facey's story is the story of Australia.Born in 1894, and first sent to work at the age of eight, Facey lived the rough frontier life of a labourer and farmer and jackaroo, becoming lost and then rescued by Indigenous trackers, then gaining a hard-won literacy, surviving Gallipoli, raising a family through the Depression, losing a son in the Second World War, and meeting his beloved Evelyn with whom he shared nearly sixty years of marriage.Despite enduring unimaginable hardships, Facey always saw his life as a fortunate one.A true classic of Australian literature, Facey's simply penned story offers a unique window onto the history of Australian life through the greater part of the twentieth century – the extraordinary journey of an ordinary man.

I'ts a great read. And a true story.