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#50768 - 05/14/18 06:19 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Andy the Aussie]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA
Originally Posted By: Andy the Aussie
From camera to laptop or computer (camera has an SD card) then to YouTube..my photo hosting site (photobucket) does video as well but I have not yet mastered that !!!


Thanks. I never got it right through photobucket and imgur doesn't offer it that I'm aware of. Have a great break away from civilization Andy!


Edited by Hard Knocks (05/14/18 06:19 PM)

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#50779 - 05/17/18 08:30 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Trumby Online   content
Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6459
Loc: NSW
Scrub bull catching, a different kind of hunting.

These days they mostly use a cut down 4X4 beefed up with heavy pipes and bars welded around it for protection, also with a bionic arm.

A couple of wild colonial boys. grin
The inventor of our iconic wild cattle catching bionic arm, Kal Carrick (pictured left driving), has been awarded a 2018 Australia Day medal for services to the livestock industry.
,

We were not so lucky to have such up market equipment. There are two old ways of doing it, one was horse tailing with a bull strap, and the other was with a dog, horse and bull strap I preferred the latter.
Tailing is where you ride the horse hard up alongside the bull, grab him by the tail by taking a twist around your hand, bail out off the horse and run beside the bull pulling it off balance, the trick then is to fasten the bull strap and immobilise the bull. Fairly dangerous. Both methods were dangerous really.
Another way is to use a good dog as well, The dog runs in and grabs the bull by the nose and hangs on while the horseman grabs the bull by the tail and pulls him over. It’s amazing how much control a good dog has over the bull.
My best ever was a cattle dog/ Rottweiler X Bull Terrier/ Doberman. laugh Trumby I called him. We had taken over a deceased estate property of three thousand acres seven mile up the road from a cattle property I was already managing, the cattle were mixed breeds, inbred and wild having not been handled/mustered for years. I made the decision to trap, muster and catch and release the bulls after cutting them, ear marking and cutting the horns off with a horn saw. Believe me, they are really pissed off by the time you release the bull strap.
The owners were keen to have the cattle off the place and to restock with good commercial Herefords. Also new fencing and fencing repairs were needed pretty much all over the place, so we would work on fencing and as we got sick of that we’d take a day off for bull catching, there were only two of us a young eighteen year old fellow “Mark” and myself.

Bull Strap

The hunt.
There would be two of us on horses and the dog, we would work our way around the cattle and try to isolate a bull from the mob and get it in amongst the trees, I would tell the dog to “Get hold of him”, he would rush in and grab the bull by the nose. The bull would never be happy about this laugh and try to rub the dog off onto a tree, I would then rush in with the horse and grab him by the tail, then reef him over onto his side, my mate would jump down onto his head while I strapped his back legs. Then the fun would begin, I would castrate him while Mark would ear mark him, then with one holding its head the other would saw its horns off.
After this we would have to let him go. grin
Mark would run and catch the horses, mount up and get out of there, I would let the strap off the bull and run for the trees and call the dog off.
If you’ve never seen murder in the eyes of an animal, that’s the perfect time to see it, he would get up in a rage, try for the dog first, realise he couldn’t catch him, then come after me. grin BY this time I’m running through the scrub like a scared rabbit and my mate would gallop the horses up to me so I could get mine and get out of there.
We would call five bulls a good day and six exceptional. It would also be a big day for the dog as well. laugh

I tried to find a picture or two on the net of stockmen doing this, but had no luck, maybe no one wanted the repercussions that would come their way if the animal libbers and tree huggers lucked onto it. grin
I probably have a hundred bush stories like this one, but not sure if anyone is interested in them.
Ian.

Some tools of the trade:
Horn saw

Saddle pouch


old Trumby at 16 years old



My newest dinner hobbles



All of my horses were trained to dinner hobbles, I could stop by a creek or river and make a cupper and have a spell as well as let the horse have a graze.



Edited to add:

I found a picture of a fella tailing. The belt that is slung low around his waist is either a bull strap or dinner hobbles, I used the latter, and still have my latest one.



Catching with the bionic arm.



_________________________


"Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most................."

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#50799 - 05/22/18 02:29 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA
Holy smokes Ian. My hat is off to you sir. I love ANY working dog stories and if nobody wants to chime in while we wait for some hog- and fallow-stories from Andy, maybe we can trade a few, or any others that you like my friend.

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#50800 - 05/22/18 05:00 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA
I'll put my story-telling cap on and share one story here that hopefully you folks know me well enough to know it's straight....

I do a lot of predator control out here. A person might think of the big animals being the worst on our stock, but a lot of the worst offenders are coyotes. Folks always think they're scavengers and such, but they are really more of an apex predator in the absence of wolves and other large predators at this point in time in this part of the world. They take many of our deer, deer and antelope fawns, and also stock calves, newborn and older, and so it's a war on them out here and there is a never-ending supply.

Anyway, one day out on the trap line my father and I drive up on a dead range cow and I rifled one coyote off of it with a bolt gun. Two more got away. The ground is steep here and open in that country, and when we get the right mix of moisture and freezing, the ground freezes down rock hard. If the stock gets caught just right and tries to negotiate the steep slopes on the frozen ground they can't dig in, and so fall and break themselves up, or get killed outright. I've seen it where they get started rolling off the slope and then fly in the air and don't hit for many feet down the hill. It's horrific really.

We talked it over and decided to be back there before light since we knew there'd be dogs all over that dead cow at first light. My dad's getting up in the years and I didn't want to drive a rig right up on them and go to jump-shooting immediately, so I elected to slip in with ar-15 that is a tack-driver. That night the wife comes in and I was loading mags and she asks what am I doing and I said getting ahead of the coyotes in the morning. She shakes her head and goes off to bed, knowing I'm in that locked-in state ha.

The next morning we jumped in the truck and headed down the line, stopping well shy from where we knew the cow lay. I didn't want anything messing up a good opportunity, so well before light I was sitting in the dark overlooking the spot where I knew the action would take place, about 250 yards out. When light started to break I scanned down in there, everything was just gray shapes with one bigger black lump that I knew was the cow....just a little longer....

A few more minutes and things started to distinguish themselves, the edge of the ice around the lake below, a sage bush, the body of the dead cow now readily seen....not a coyote in sight....what the heck...

Then, gray ears showing over a black angus body. Yep, there's one. No, two and then three, blocked by the body of the cow...I settled in to get serious.

I needed a target to get clear, and sent up a prayer for this to go right. One of the females moved to the right and out away from the others...I swung the crosshairs. Just then, a big male came out of the brush 50 yards beyond the others. I remember thinking that's a big son of a gun, probably the boss here. The female evidently agreed. She looked over at him and moved off the frozen lake, out of my view, and into a finger of draw hidden by the low light. Dang it...time to start the ball....

I wanted the big male first. I knew after the first shot it was going to be a total crap shoot what happened next. I was already settled in and the yardage ranged. I layed the crosshairs just over his back and squeezed off a round downrange, ever so gently, breaking the stillness of the morning.

Without another thought to the first coyote, I immediately dropped down to the next, another male although I didn't know it yet, running from left to right in the line of the female that left before the shooting started. Dead in line with the cow, my mind knows it's right at 250. He's on ice, not got a full head of steam up, just a little lead and one, two, he drops in the back end and skids a ways across the ice before scrambling up and out of sight.

No time to think about him, is there anything else in view....a female running the shoreline from right to left, but closing distance to me, maybe 225 yards, now 200. I let a barrage of shots go at her. She was belly down, ears back, and running full out. I finally realized I was leading her too far. I kept squeezing the trigger and let the crosshairs cut the lead until she tumbled and piled up head-long in full view on the edge of the frozen lake.

Son of a gun, what's left.....there's nothing in view moving. Well there shouldn't be, I'd just let about a dozen shots go, most of them at dog #3. I stand up, incredulous at getting that much shooting in, and of a sudden the female that left the ice ahead of the big male comes breaking around the bend of the hill and headed as hard as she can straight into me. I can only figure that the bullets were striking beyond her, and since she was out of my view when the shooting started, she misjudged it and ran right into me. She doesn't see me until not over 30 yards away, at which point she turns inside out but has no place to go. It's open snow fields for a thousand yards and I'm standing at the ready with a hot AR in my hands....

Wow. Just wow. I can see two dead coyotes layed out, one right in front of me. I feel really good about the other two. I know for sure I've got a hit on one of them, and the other had a round sent from a dead rest, even if the range was long.

I started back around the hill to gather up my dad and drive the road that was a little higher, but went farther around the lake. I had one coyote with me and I could see my dad peeking around the corner dying to hear the outcome...'what in the world do you got going up there son, that sounded like Custer's last stand....' grin

I loaded coyote #4 and we headed around the lake and picked up coyote #2, maybe 25 yards from where he went out of sight. Then on around to dog #3 who was laying where she fell, the farthest around the lake. That's three in the truck. Where the heck was dog #1,the big boy?!!

No tracks crossing the road, and he's not laying in the culvert under the road. We turn around and I hike down to examine the hard-packed snow where he was when the shooting started....slight blood specks in the snow, he's hit.

I continue up the creek, track by track, speck by speck until going into the thickest doghair growth along the creek I see him wedged in so tight that he's still upright, but deader than a door-nail. There he was in all his stinking I've-been-rolling-in-a-rotten-cow-for-days glory.

And there they were, four coyotes piled up in a few seconds of shooting. Those conditions won't happen again in my lifetime. But, it happened once smile

t

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#50805 - 05/22/18 06:06 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Trumby Online   content
Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6459
Loc: NSW
That's a great story HK, to get the drop on any wild animal is never easy.
_________________________


"Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most................."

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#50818 - 05/23/18 01:58 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Trumby]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA
Originally Posted By: Trumby
That's a great story HK, to get the drop on any wild animal is never easy.


They are cagey, to say the least!


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#50861 - 05/30/18 06:28 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Trumby Online   content
Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6459
Loc: NSW
They look to be about the same size as our Dingo's, but a heavier coat and the Dingo's are red and can be any color between that and white.

Some on the coast can be black, but I'm not convinced that they are pure bread like the central Australian ones.
_________________________


"Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most................."

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#50886 - 06/04/18 10:07 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA
We have canines in the country south of us that are known as Red Wolves. Size-wise they're in between gray wolves and coyotes. There was a push to put them on the endangered list some years ago, but when the studies on them concluded, it was found that they had no dna that was unique from gray wolves and coyotes. It was concluded that they were a hybrid, and of course hybrids are afforded no protection.

Every once in awhile there is still an extra large coyote taken in that part of the country, and it is my guess that there is some of the red wolf hybrid genetics in those animals, from the days where the prairie wolf interbred with coyotes.

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#50887 - 06/04/18 10:16 PM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Hard Knocks Offline
Senior Member

Registered: 07/31/13
Posts: 1189
Loc: SW Idaho USA

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#50889 - 06/05/18 03:08 AM Re: Hunting Pictures and Stories [Re: Hard Knocks]
Trumby Online   content
Aussie Bush Rat
Rattus norvegicus

Registered: 05/08/12
Posts: 6459
Loc: NSW
That is very interesting, the red wolves, being hybrid means they are interbreeding.
Similar to our dingoes in the coastal areas, however you don't see that out in the center, probably beacause of it's remote country.

Those pelts look beautifully prepared, differently to how we prepped fox skins, they were stapled out on a flat surface, there was right and wrong ways of pegging them out just the same.
When I used to save them up to make the numbers worthwhile for a long trip I used to spray mine with baygon to keep the nasties off them.
_________________________


"Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most................."

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